Archive for October 2018

The Not-So-Big Bird

I have always been a very huge fan of a not very huge bird – the so-called rock Cornish game hen. I’m sure I will love eating the bird forever. But I must admit, I was disappointed to learn just how little of the name I grew up respecting isn’t something akin to a lie,…

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Bravo Bibimbap!

If I were a dish instead of a person, or even a dish named after a person or a person named after a dish, I’d really like my name to be Bibimbap. It sounds enough like “this and that” to make and keep a promise of the versatile, freeform wonders of Korea’s single most famous…

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Twice-Cooked Cookies

Showing every sign of good sense and more than a little good taste, the world has finally embraced the ancient Italian confection known simply as Twice Cooked. You might be wishing for a more romanticized, less workaday sort of name. Still, ever since the Roman legions discovered that these cookies retained their quality for days…

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Maine’s Favorite Roll

Though it would be hard to construct a scary new edition of “Jurassic Park” around them, lobsters look like prehistoric creatures to anyone paying the slightest attention. In fact, by definition, they are prehistoric – covering the shorelines of the New World when the first European settlers started arriving at the beginning of the 17th…

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Santorini’s Wine Tourism

Santorini is a small island on the southern edge of Greece’s Aegean Sea, small certainly if measured in square miles (less than 25) and arguably if measured by impact on world history. Yet thanks to one iconic wine grape and a dazzling origin story that might actually be true, this purple-black volcanic rock rising from…

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The Mystery of Prague

My journey to Prague began as a postcard, truth be told: one of those faded, crumpled cards in a flea market long ago – I don’t remember where or when. Yet the city in that vintage photograph seemed filled with castles, with shuttered windows and cobblestones and statues and balconies, and drifts of white snow,…

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Richard Ford @ The Folger

Eudora Welty, whose closely observed, very Southern fiction included the 1973 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Optimist’s Daughter and the much-read-in-schools short story “Why I Live at the P.O.,” barely ventured outside her own neighborhood in Jackson, Miss. Today, her home is a National Historic Landmark that’s open for tours. And if you ask anyone in…

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New Glenstone, Part 2

The 204,000-square-foot Pavilions are intriguing, and not without their own updated version of trompe l’oeil. The area is a cluster of eleven stark gray boxes rising from earth toward sky, and from any distance you can’t tell how large or small they are unless someone is walking alongside them. Yet if you think these buildings…

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New Glenstone, Part 1

The century-long journey from museum as exposition to museum as experience finds its ultimate expression, for now and the foreseeable future, at Glenstone – the newly and vastly expanded museum of contemporary art in the rolling, altogether monied hills of Maryland. While the spotlight here is on the likes of Rothko, Twombly, Pollock, Calder, Warhol…

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South African Renewal

With more than three centuries of winemaking under its oh-so-rugged belt, South Africa is one of the oldest new wine regions on earth. Or should we say newest old wine regions? A visit to the bottom of the mammoth African continent is humbling for its sense of wine history reaching back to Dutch settlers in…

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