Posts by DM Magazine

Baking Your Own Fruitcake

I woke up this morning, raced to the lighted, decorated tree and, once again, discovered that Santa had failed to bring me a fruitcake. I love those things. And considering how many people proclaim they despise them, you’d think Santa or anybody else in my circle could spare at least one. But no. I even…

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The Feast of Seven Fishes

Around the world, wherever Christmas is celebrated, Christmas Eve is a time of waiting. And because, other than kids waiting for Santa, that often means adults committed to fasting and abstinence, what a lot of those adults are waiting for is food. Southern Italy, Sicily and virtually all the Little Italys in this republic named…

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Huevos for the Holidays

I never really loved eggs very much, raised in a world in which they came only with bacon and, if I was lucky, buttered grits – until I found my way to Mexican egg dishes. Now, from huevos rancheros to the colorfully named huevos divorciados, from migas to breakfast tacos, I’m finally in love with…

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Sweet Potatoes vs. Yams

I’ve always been blasé about sweet potatoes, during the holidays or any other time. The straightforward version my parents served probably took their best shot with their browned, softened marshmallows on top, which invariably brought back happy memories of toasting marshmallows with friends and family over an outdoor fire. Friends and family – that’s what…

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Post-Turkey Day Taco Salad

If you love so-called taco salads or taco bowls – essentially a taco that’s turned upside down, or might it be inside out? – you owe a special debt of gratitude to a restaurant rather ridiculously named Casa de Fritos. In 1955. At Disneyland. Yes, the iconic theme park created by Uncle Walt was home…

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Leguizamo’s Latin History

The National Theater in the nation’s capital is located on Pennsylvania Avenue – as is Donald Trump’s White House. Still, during John Leguizamo’s three Washington performances of Latin History for Morons, there the similarity ends. Far more than an attack on Trump’s benighted “Build the Wall” immigration policies, however, Leguizamo’s play fresh from a Tony-nominated…

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The Venice of Our Dreams

The first time I saw Venice and walked across its flooded Piazza San Marco on makeshift wooden scaffolding was in the icy winter of 1974. The sea the Venetians ruled for centuries had triumphed the night before, a seemingly eternal curse that sounds benign by its official name “high water” – acqua alta – but…

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Whose Side Are You On?

If you’re looking for the birthplace of one all-American Thanksgiving food tradition, you might end up looking far beyond those Plymouth Rock-Pilgrims to Larsa, a city that happens to be in modern-day Iraq. You can gaze with curiosity and wonder at a 3,700-year-old clay tablet that contains not the famous Ten Commandments of Moses but…

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A Gratin with Gratitude

Another Thanksgiving is almost here, another feast built around all or most of our favorite flavors from the past. But if you’re looking for one more over-the-top vegetable dish for your Thanksgiving table, you might sample something new this year that’s actually almost as old to the French as Pilgrims and native Americans are to…

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‘Amadeus’ for the Ages

The late British playwright Peter Shaffer was blessed with two of the most unlikely gifts: creating dazzling intellectual puzzles with more than one satisfying solution, and turning out scripts that delighted multitudes, became hit films and made him a wealthy man. His two best-known works for the stage, Equus and Amadeus, were renowned for the…

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